I had a crush on 2015

2015 was a year of finally getting busy with some of my secret artist crushes. First I got to wear a one-piece soldier costume and fabulous hair in A Broken Umbrella Theatre’s collaboration with the Shubert Theatre, SEEN CHANGE.

Then, Collective Consciousness Theatre brought How to Break, my hip-hop play about being ill, to Hartford with our partner in crime (and theatre for social change) HartBeat Ensemble. Check out my conversation about sickle cell disease, hip-hop theatre, and vulnerability with Virginia Pertillar, Executive Director of Citizens for Quality Sickle Cell Care.

Along with some of my biggest playwright crushes (David Henry Hwang, Lynn Nottage, Kris Diaz, Dominique Morisseau), I wrote a play for Oregon Shakespeare Festival and One-Minute Play Festival’s Every 28 Hours festival in Ferguson and St. Louis.

Byron Au Yong and I gave New York Theatre Workshop googly eyes while they workshopped Stuck Elevator at Dartmouth, where we got to work with Ed Sylvanus Iskander and go on wacky field trips.

Byron and I continued developing Trigger at residencies with Virginia Tech, Weston Playhouse, the International Festival of Arts & Ideas, and, most recently, the Millay Colony for the Arts, where I got to write in the barn Edna St. Vincent Millay built, pick apples from the tree she planted, and hold hands with her ghost.

And, in what’s turning into a longterm love story (not just a crush), The Word’s 2015 Citywide Poetry Jam mobilized over 100 fiery young New Haven poets and emcees (join out Facebook group to connect to the 2016 Jam).

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  • “[Stuck Elevator] is a fascinating and compelling work that proves strong ideas can’t be contained in simple boxes... claustrophobic and expansive, intimate and existential, personal and political all at once.” – Variety
  • About Aaron

    Aaron Jafferis is a hip hop poet and playwright. Read his bio, his CV, or contact him.